Welcome to Marvelous Margot, your newest source on the Australian actress Margot Robbie. You probably know Margot for her launching role in Martin Scorsese's Wolf of Wall Street, and most recently seen in The Legend of Tarzan (as Jane Porter) and Suicide Squad (Harley Quinn). Her upcoming projects include I, Tonya - where she plays the ice skater Tonya Harding, and Gotham City Sirens - movie centered on the female criminals of the DC Universe.

The site aim is to update you with all the latest news, photos and media concerning Margot's career. Take a look around and enjoy your stay! Thank you for visiting the site and be sure to come back soon!
Archive for the ‘Press’ Category
Emily   11.18.2017   0 Comments

Margot graces the December issue of Vogue Australia. Check out the beautiful cover and some outtakes in the gallery. Scans will be added soon!

Magazine Scans > From 2017 > December: Vogue Australia [+1]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 18 | Vogue Australia [+3]

VOGUE AUSTRALIA – Margot Robbie opens the door to an enormous hacienda-style mansion in Albuquerque, New Mexico, a door lined with Halloween pumpkins of varying sizes and hilarity. “Hi, I’m Margot!” she offers with a huge grin. Suddenly a scruffy little black rescue dog the size of a feather duster leaps out, spinning in circles, and Robbie’s smile turns to a frown of panic: “Oh, be careful, he might pee on you!” The pooch, named Boo Radley, jumps up and begins standing on two legs with such panache that you forget he is actually a four-legged animal.

It is a comical moment akin to a scene out of a Woody Allen comedy that morphs into Entourage: the bombshell movie star – dressed off-duty in dark denim overalls, a striped red-and-blue T-shirt and white hotel slippers – and her excitable canine named after one of literature’s most famous characters, holding court in the middle of the desert. The rest of the home’s residents, who come and go over the next two hours, make up the supporting cast: there is Josey McNamara, the friend and business partner who appears from another room halfway through the interview, Sophia Kerr, the childhood bestie who doubles as an assistant and pops in from behind a stairwell, and Tom Ackerley, the handsome, laconic husband who wanders into the kitchen from the gym. Only this is Robbie’s real life, these are her real friends, and this is more than just a movie.

Robbie, 27, encompasses everything you want from a leading lady: she is funny and feisty, a femme fatale with looks to die for and a business-savvy, brilliant attitude to boot. She talks feminism and being a female role model as easily as discussing her favourite fashions while simultaneously crunching movie budget numbers like a seasoned accountant. Her favourite term “100 per cent” slips into conversation as easily as her other typical twentysomething saying, “like”; and her face lights up at the sight of her husband as much as it does when she discusses her absolute love for making movies. Family and friends are obviously her primary passions, with films coming in a very close second.

It has been 10 years since Robbie burst onto our TV screens in Neighbours before making the leap to Hollywood with a life-changing, scene-stealing turn in The Wolf of Wall Street in 2013. Since then her movie repertoire has run the gamut from indie films (Suite Française, Z For Zachariah) to comedies (Focus, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot) to blockbusters (The Legend of Tarzan, Suicide Squad). In the coming months, she will appear in the period dramas Mary, Queen of Scots (in which she plays Queen Elizabeth I with a receding hairline and scarred skin) and Goodbye, Christopher Robin, in which she portrays Winnie-the-Pooh author AA Milne’s socialite wife Daphne with perfectly British aplomb. And while her star continues to rise, Robbie, not one to just sit back and enjoy the trimmings of Hollywood success, is now venturing further and stepping up into her newest role: that of producer and self-described president of her own production company. She is taking control of her own destiny from behind the scenes, where she wants to be a female role model by example, in charge of producing female-driven content.

I already work with a ton of female writers who are brilliant, and I want to work with female directors,” she says. “I really want to work with actresses my own age. I’m trying so hard to get projects up and running with an ensemble of young female characters, because that’s my life, my group of girls, we’re a gang and we roll together and I’m like: ‘Why is that not reflected in film?’” She adds that a matured sense of confidence from several years honing the machinations of Hollywood has propelled her to take on producing. “I feel like I’ve been in the business long enough now watching other people make those decisions. I’ve had enough experiences to have more of an opinion like: ‘Actually, I wouldn’t have done it like that, or I think they should have done something different right now.’ So now I get to be one of those people who say: “Hey, maybe we should do it a little differently.” It’s nice to have that opportunity. It’s enormously satisfying to build something and to be part of something and to take control of my career.”

Read the rest of the story/interview at the source

Nicole   10.19.2017   0 Comments

ELLE – Before being honored at the ELLE Women in Hollywood celebration, Margot Robbie watched a Hollywood classic, The Breakfast Club, and found herself inspired by the on-screen high schoolers’ assignment to write a 1000-word essay on “who you think you are.” So in lieu of a traditional speech, she wrote that essay—to Hollywood.

Read her letter below:

Dear Hollywood,

We accept that we had to sacrifice a whole week standing our ground and defending our rights as women. But we think you’re crazy to make us write an essay telling you who we think we are when you still see as you want to see us: in the simplest terms and the most convenient definitions.

Being a woman in Hollywood means you will probably have to fight through degrading situations and will be offered chauvinistic roles by men who think that that’s all anybody wants to see us play. But even those of us lucky enough to have established a career in the hallowed grounds of show business are still in the shadows of the big trees, constantly reminded that we only grow in the sunshine they allow us. These difficulties we face are to share the same spirit of those faced by countless women all over the world who struggle for the right to earn a living, the right to be heard, and even the right to be safe from harm.

In recent years, superhero films have been all the rage, and I should know as I have benefitted from the trend. I only wish we could transfer a little bit of that heroism into reality. That those heroes we admire in movies would defend us against the villains in government, in the workplace, in the entertainment industry, and even in the most basic human interactions. There are women in and out of Hollywood that have proven this week that they are those real heroes. Their bravery and courage to speak truth to power has made a powerful impact that can be the start of real change. It is our decision, and those of us that have a platform can choose to use it for those in the world who do not. Which means that, we can not only highlight the painful inequities, but we can continue to speak out as long as they exist. And we can keep drawing attention to injustice wherever we find it and to use our talents and intellects and privilege to help a new chapter of women, a chapter for all of us.

So thinking about being a woman in Hollywood reminded me that when you take away Hollywood, we are all just women, all facing the inequalities that being a women brings with it. And, what I’ve come to understand is that, though we are unique and powerful as individuals, we are invincible when we come together. So, some may have seen us as objects and other individuals, but never as equals. But, in the words of The Breakfast Club, each one of us is a brain and an athlete and a basket case and a princess and a criminal. Does that answer your question?

Sincerely yours, The Girls Club.

(source)

Nicole   10.05.2017   0 Comments

Margot is featured in the November issue of W Magazine, with an amazing new editorial and a brand new interview. Check the photos in our gallery and read part of the interview below (and find the rest at the source!)

W MAGAZINE – When Margot Robbie read the script for I, Tonya, a biopic of the notorious ice skater Tonya Harding, she assumed the story was complete fiction. “I thought the writer was so quirky and crazy to come up with this stuff,” she told me, still looking a bit astonished by the strange twists in Harding’s life. (In 1994, the skater was famously implicated in a plot to take down her nemesis Nancy Kerrigan after a man attacked Kerrigan with a baton.) We were on location for the W shoot in Snug Harbor, a bucolic Staten Island enclave founded in the early 1800s as a haven for old sailors. There was something appealingly run-down and shabby about the setting, but Robbie, who is 27, is a glow-y girl: With blond hair and an engaged manner, she can’t help but shine.

Which is why it is so remarkable that Robbie was able to completely disappear into Harding’s decidedly darker persona. A self-described redneck from Oregon, Harding was the antithesis of the traditional superstar figure skater. She was rough and flashy, and her skating was powerful and athletic rather than graceful and balletic. Harding’s ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly, and her bodyguard, Shawn Eckardt, were ultimately charged with criminal conspiracy to commit assault. While Kerrigan recovered from her injuries in time to compete in the ’94 Olympics, the incident propelled Harding to tabloid infamy and effectively ended her skating career.

“I was 4 years old and living in Australia at the time,” Robbie said. “The news did reach Australia, but I didn’t know about it.”
Riveted by the script, Robbie immediately agreed to star in and produce the film—despite that fact that she had never figure skated in her life. “I did four months of training, five days a week, four hours a day,” she recalled. “On Christmas Eve, I was at the rink. And now I actually really miss it. I kept my ice skates—but I said goodbye to a whole world of pain that I didn’t realize came along with figure skating.”

Not only did Robbie have to be believable on the ice, she also had to take on the even more difficult challenge of assuming Harding’s accent and physique. “Once I put on the wig, which altered my hairline, and bleached my eyebrows, I started to see Tonya,” Robbie said. “The hardest part was losing my natural laugh. It needed to be Tonya’s laugh. I couldn’t do a triple axel like Tonya, but I was able to master her laugh.”

Read the rest of the story/interview at the source


Magazine Scans > From 2017 > November: W Magazine [+1]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 13 | W Magazine [+8]
Nicole   09.20.2017   0 Comments

VARIETY“I, Tonya,” Craig Gillespie’s film following Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding’s fall from grace, will have its U.S. premiere as the closing night screening of the 2017 Hamptons International Film Festival.

The 25th anniversary festival will also host a special event for Jordan Peele’s breakout “Get Out,” to explore scenes from the film and open conversations about its theme. Peele and his fellow “Get Out” producers Jason Blum and Sean McKittrick, along with stars Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams, will be in attendance.

The full slate of the festival includes Joe Wright’s “Darkest Hour” starring Gary Oldman; Reginald Hudlin’s “Marshall” starring Chadwick Boseman, Josh Gad, Sterling K. Brown, and Kate Hudson; Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” starring Ben Stiller, Adam Sandler, Dustin Hoffman, and Emma Thompson; and Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck” starring Julianne Moore and Michelle Williams.

The World Cinema Documentary titles include Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s “Love, Cecil;” and Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s “One of Us,” while the World Cinema Narrative films include Jonas Carpignano’s “A Ciambra,” and Sebastián Lelio’s “A Fantastic Woman.”

The festival will also present a special screening of Bryan Fogel’s “Icarus,” winner of the 2017 SummerDocs audience award. Julie Andrews will be honored with a lifetime achievement award Oct. 7, and talent attending the festival include Annette Bening, Josh Gad, Mariska Hargitay, Richard Jenkins and Margot Robbie.

The 2017 festival will take place Oct. 5-9, with more than 65 features and 50 shorts representing a total of 40 countries. (source)

Nicole   09.10.2017   0 Comments

VANITY FAIR – For millions of people, Nancy Kerrigan being attacked in January 1994 was a defining cultural moment and one of the most high-profile scandals in the history of American sports. But for Margot Robbie, the Australian actress who plays Tonya Harding in the upcoming Craig Gillespie-directed indie, I, Tonya, the controversy was totally foreign.

“I think I was about four years old when the incident took place,” the 27-year-old actress told Vanity Fair’s Krista Smith on Friday, hours before the film premiered at the Toronto Film Festival. “I was in Australia and totally unaware of the whole incident and the crazy controversy.”

“To be honest, when I read the script, I didn’t know who Tonya Harding was, and I didn’t realize it was a true story,” Robbie went on. (Steven Rogers wrote the screenplay.) “I thought it was entirely fictionalized and our writer Steve was so creative to come up with the quirky characters and absurd incidents.”

Robbie signed on to both star in and produce the project, diving down an Internet rabbit hole of research to study every YouTube video of Harding she could find. Robbie also underwent an elaborate makeover. The film’s hair and makeup team transformed the actress multiple times so she could convincingly portray Harding at a variety of ages, from 15 to 44. To round out the preparation, Robbie trained for four months with choreographer Sarah Kawahara—who, ironically, once worked with Kerrigan—hoping to elevate her leisure-skating skills so that she could realistically approximate the two-time Olympian.

“I played ice hockey at one point, but this was a whole new world of pain,” Robbie said, adding that she suffered a herniated disk in her neck while preparing for the role. One unforgettable moment during filming made Robbie realize just how talented Harding was—and how sad it was that her athletic talents were overshadowed by the attack on Kerrigan, which was partially masterminded by Harding’s ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly.

“I don’t think I ever really appreciated [her talent] until we were figuring out how we were going to shoot the triple axel in the film,” Robbie said. The film’s director and producers assumed they could just hire a skate double to complete the stunt—even though Harding was the first American woman to perform a triple axel in competition. (After all, hadn’t the sport progressed significantly in the 23 years since the incident?) Then they were told that only six women in history had completed that complicated jump in competition—and none could double for Harding. (The filmmakers ultimately had to use visual effects to complete the scene.)

Gillespie has said that he hopes to humanize Harding with the film, showing that the figure skater, who had a tumultuous relationship with her mother, had lived a story much more tragic and complicated than what the media portrayed in its narrative.

Harding was aware of the film from the start, since Rogers had commissioned her life rights and interviewed both Harding and Gillooly before writing the script. After finishing the film, Gillespie, Rogers, and Robbie screened the movie for Harding, who was moved to both tears and laughter.

“I think it is a lot for someone to have the most traumatic events of their life encompassed in a two-hour film,” Robbie said. “I feel like you have to be very brave to let someone do that. I don’t know if I could do that, and she handled it incredibly.”

“I don’t know what I was expecting, but I had spent so many hours watching her every interview and every bit of skating,” Robbie said of her meeting with Harding. “I feel like I had done nothing but watch and listen to Tonya for the last year—so it was really weird to see that person literally in front of me. It was a bizarre experience. She was so kind. I was taken aback by how worried she was about me, weirdly. After all the things she has been through, she just kept asking if I was O.K.” (source)