Welcome to Marvelous Margot, your newest source on the Australian actress Margot Robbie. You probably know Margot for her launching role in Martin Scorsese's Wolf of Wall Street, and most recently seen in The Legend of Tarzan (as Jane Porter) and Suicide Squad (Harley Quinn). Her upcoming projects include I, Tonya - where she plays the ice skater Tonya Harding, and Gotham City Sirens - movie centered on the female criminals of the DC Universe.

The site aim is to update you with all the latest news, photos and media concerning Margot's career. Take a look around and enjoy your stay! Thank you for visiting the site and be sure to come back soon!
Archive for the ‘Photos’ Category
Nicole   01.05.2018   0 Comments

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER – Figure skating’s most notorious character shares memories of the scandal that ended her career with the star who plays her — and reveals she’s back in training.

Margot Robbie waited until filming was just about to begin before she and director Craig Gillespie took a trip to Portland to have lunch with the woman she was about to play. Their second meeting came nearly a year later, when Tonya Harding joined Robbie on the red carpet for I, Tonya‘s Hollywood premiere. The following day, on Dec. 6, Robbie sat down with Harding, 47, for a wide-ranging conversation about the disgraced Olympian’s life now with her current husband, Joe, a heating and air conditioning specialist, and their 6-year-old son, Gordon, as well as the highs and lows of her days on the ice.

While Robbie switched between roles as interviewer and interviewee, Harding spoke candidly about her fraught relationships with both her ex Jeff Gillooly, who spent six months in prison following the 1994 assault on Harding’s then-rival Nancy Kerrigan, and her mother, with whom she’s been estranged since the early 2000s. At one point in the hourlong discussion, during which the former competitor revealed that she was back in training (she’s set to skate in an exhibition at Rockefeller Center in late January), a teary Harding thanked Robbie for not only telling her story but also providing her with closure. (Read the rest of the interview at the source)

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER An ingenue turns indie producer with the figure skating biopic ‘I, Tonya’ as she opens up about the downside of starring in ‘Suicide Squad’ (“Now you have to be able to afford security”) and maps out a plan for career longevity: “I don’t want to burn hard and fast and then disappear.”

Before Margot Robbie set out for Hollywood, an agent in her native Australia advised her to prepare to answer a question she’d inevitably be asked when she arrived.

“What do you want out of your career?”

Robbie, then 20 and starring in a local soap opera, took the advice seriously. She began scribbling pages and pages of notes before ultimately whittling her answer down to just three words: “Quality, versatility and longevity.” Nail the first two, she thought, and the third will follow.

Not a half decade later, Robbie had exploded into Hollywood with her breakthrough performance as the fiery wife of Leonardo DiCaprio’s Jordan Belfort in the 2013 box-office smash The Wolf of Wall Street. She’d taken what could have been a forgettable role — described in Terence Winter’s script as the “hottest blonde ever” — and made something memorable out of it. She was promptly deluged with offers to play the “hot wife” or “hot girlfriend” of other A-list actors. Flattered as Robbie was by the sudden attention, such inessential characters didn’t fit into her career plan, and she turned nearly all of them down. “You could read a script and almost pull them out and nothing else would be affected,” she says now, between sips of tea on her back patio in Los Angeles. “Like if you pulled out that card, the card castle wouldn’t come tumbling down, and that’s not that exciting to me.” (Read the rest of the interview at the source)

Check the beautiful cover and photoshoot Margot (and Tonya) did for this Golden Globes 2018 issue of The Hollywood Reporter!

Magazine Scans > From 2018 > January 04: The Hollywood Reporter [+1]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > Session 03 | The Hollywood Reporter [+4]
Nicole   01.04.2018   0 Comments

BRITISH VOGUE – Photographed by Juergen Teller and styled by Edward Enninful, the portrait of the duo sets the tone for the 20-page Hollywood portfolio within the editor-in-chief’s third issue of #NewVogue. Entitled “Best Performances”, the shoot celebrates the stars whose Oscar-worthy roles embody cinema’s new mood and Hollywood’s reevaluation of itself.

“When I first decided that Vogue should put together a star-filled portfolio featuring the biggest names in current cinema to mark the exceptional 2017/18 awards season,” Enninful said, “who knew Hollywood would soon be top of the global news agenda? It was clear to me that the mood needed to change. That it was time for honesty. Enter photographer Juergen Teller, my long-time collaborator and the world’s most gifted documenter of celebrity at its most intimate and off-duty. Over four days in Los Angeles, it was great to spend time with him and some of today’s amazing talents as they look to reshape how Hollywood does business in a post-Weinstein world, including cover stars Margot Robbie and Nicole Kidman – two of the most straight-talking professionals I’ve ever had the pleasure of working with.”

Of her ascendant career, Robbie told interviewer Lynn Hirschberg: “My family has no connection to the entertainment industry whatsoever, so when I started acting, everyone was like, ‘That’s fun, but when are you going to actually get a real job?’ And that went on for years. They’re impressed for five seconds, and then they’re, ‘So anyway, the dog threw up today.’”

[…] (source)

W MAGAZINE“When I was 6, my favorite film was Robin Hood: Men in Tights. It’s got a lot of adult jokes, and it was really inappropriate for a child to see. In school, they asked us, ‘If you were to make a potion, what would you put in it?’ Even then, I could recall lines of movies, and I said, ‘The testicles of a newt!’ I got called up to the front of the class and was asked why I put testicles in my potion. I had no idea what testicles were—I just loved the film.” (source)

Magazine Scans > From 2018 > February: British Vogue [+1]
Magazine Scans > From 2018 > W Magazine Best Performances Issue [+1]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > Session 01 | British Vogue [+1]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > Session 02 | W Magazine [+1]
Nicole   12.26.2017   0 Comments

As a Christmas treat, we’ve updated the gallery adding additional solo and group outtakes from the I, Tonya Los Angeles Times portrait session. Enjoy them, and Merry Christmas (even if a day late!)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 23 | ‘I, Tonya’ Portrait for Los Angeles Times [+5]
Nicole   12.23.2017   0 Comments

LOS ANGELES TIMES – As part of the recent lead actress Envelope Roundtable, actress Margot Robbie talked about her work on the darkly comic biopic “I, Tonya.” Having grown up in Australia, Robbie wasn’t aware of the infamous saga of figure skater Tonya Harding. So she was able to approach the performance with a fresh perspective.

“In hindsight, I’m really grateful I wasn’t aware of the situation, or I didn’t know who any of these people were going into it, so I could really approach it with no preconceived notions or judgment,” she said. “I quickly found out that everyone had passed judgment on her.”

Check some portraits taken during the roundtable session in our gallery! (thanks to I Heart Saoirse for the help!)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 24 | LA Times “The Envelope” Portraits [+5]
Nicole   12.19.2017   0 Comments

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER – After two decades of awards-season roundtables gathering Hollywood’s top creative talents for frank, funny and memorable conversations, THR this year decided to throw out the rule book for the final star-studded sit-down of 2017: Instead of splitting up male and female actors (as almost all honors do, from the industry-establishment Oscars to the indie-minded Spirit Awards), the Dec. 7 discussion at West Hollywood’s Quixote Studios was a co-ed affair. And instead of taking place in a clinically silent, closed studio environment, it was conducted before a live audience of Hollywood insiders who took in the proceedings with laughs (especially at 61-year-old Last Flag Flying star Bryan Cranston’s impish one-liners), sighs (at the cautiously hopeful comments about sexual harassment in Hollywood from In the Fade’s Diane Kruger, 41, and The Shape of Water’s Octavia Spencer, 47) and a few gasps (mostly to do with I, Tonya’s Margot Robbie, 27, and a severed foot — read on). These stars, together with Call Me by Your Name’s Armie Hammer, 31, and Good Time’s Robert Pattinson, 31, didn’t let the 200 people watching cramp their conversational style — they’re actors, after all — as they animated one of the most competitive awards seasons in memory with a lively back-and-forth about the craft that unites them and the kind of artists, leaders and mentors they want to be.

This is the first time THR has mixed male and female actors on the same roundtable. So what is an issue that you have always wanted to discuss with actors of the opposite sex?

MARGOT ROBBIE I normally avoid conflict at all costs. I haven’t worked with an actor whom I’ve despised, but I have worked with someone on the production side who — I didn’t appreciate the way they spoke about me in front of groups. It took me a couple of months, but I plucked up the courage and pulled him aside and said, “You’re discrediting what I do when you speak to me like that.” He was really great about it.

(Read the rest of the transcript at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 26 | The Hollywood Reporter Roundtable Portraits [+4]
Nicole   12.14.2017   0 Comments

Back on Tuesday night (December 12), Margot attended the Neon Chritmas Party, together with her I, Tonya co-stars Allison Janney and Paul Hauser. She looked beautiful in a Dolce&Gabbana festive dress.

Several photos from the event have now been added to the gallery, be sure to check them out! She looked gorgeous as usual ♥

Public Appearances > 2017 > Dec 12 | Neon Christmas Party [+28]
Nicole   12.12.2017   0 Comments

LOS ANGELES TIMES – Nominated for a Golden Globe for her performance as figure skater Tonya Harding in “I, Tonya,” Margot Robbie talks to The Times about the movie and the female-driven films of 2017.

Where are you?
I’m here in L.A., I’m at home.

Were you up this morning to watch the nominations?
No, I was asleep. I woke up to do some prep before meetings this morning and my phone was blowing up, I had like 70 messages. And I thought, oh God, has the world ended? And then I opened them and saw everyone was saying congratulations.

What do you think that people are responding to in the movie?
I don’t know, it’s not a traditional biopic, the script and the film really break the mold when it comes to what you expect to see in a film. And I think people appreciate that, it’s more refreshing and engaging that way.

There’s been an overwhelming response. We were doing a Q&A last night at the Dome, at the ArcLight, and it was completely packed and it was wild to realize that so many people were interested in our film.

Considering your role as a producer, not just as an actor, that must feel even better.
Absolutely, when you produce a film you really devote years of your life to it. The idea of putting so much time and effort into something and no one even wanting to see it would be heartbreaking, so to have so many people not only want to see it but to respond so positively towards it is just the most incredible feeling.

Why Tonya? What do you think it is about her story right now that’s connecting with people?
There are so many elements of the story and the script and our film specifically. It’s a very entertaining film, people get swept up in the ride of it, but there is also a bigger conversation there, about class in America, and the disenfranchised and media and how we consume it without question. And the idea of what a woman is supposed to be, what we’re told we have to be to fit in.

There’s just so many bigger conversations, that even when we were making it we didn’t realize would be so topical at the time. That right now it just all seems to have come to a head, both when the film comes out and with society reaching this point this year. I think it’s incredibly relevant, terrifyingly relevant, in fact, but also entertaining, which is all we want to do as filmmakers, is entertain and challenge an audience. If you can do both in the one film, then I think that’s something really special.

People have talked about there being so many strong, female driven films this year, with “I, Tonya,” “Lady Bird,” “Wonder Woman,” “Molly’s Game” and others. What does that mean to you? What do you think when you see so many of these female-driven films doing well this year?
I’m thrilled, obviously. It’s funny, I’m not surprised, because I know so many brilliant women. Not just in this industry, I mean my friends back home are doing incredible things and just proving time and time again that women are so often underestimated and overlooked.

Everyone is really letting their voices be heard this year, and I think it’s fantastic. When you see Sofia Coppola win at Cannes, and you see ‘Wonder Woman” smash the box office, it’s so encouraging for everyone who is really trying to let their voice be heard.

“I, Tonya” is directed by a man, Craig Gillespie, and many people today are talking about the fact that there weren’t any women nominated for directing. So even when it seems things are advancing, you still bump up against some kind of ceiling.
There is still a long way to go and, of course, there’s always things I think we need to work on and do better as a society, as an industry, as individuals.

But we also really need to take the time to celebrate the wonderful achievements, and I think today is a day for celebrating.

It must be exciting for you to see Allison Janney nominated as well.
It’s incredible. From the second I read this character, I thought she is going to smash it, and she did. She really did something spectacular with this character and working with her has honestly been one of the highlights of my career. (source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 24 | The Los Angeles Times Portraits [+2]
Nicole   12.10.2017   0 Comments

THE LOS ANGELES TIMES – It is an event that lives on in tabloid infamy: the tale of figure skaters Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan and their battle to make it to the 1994 Winter Olympics. The new film “I, Tonya” reframes that story to fully spotlight Harding, transforming her from a media-made villain into someone far more human, fragile and tragic.

A title card at the beginning of the film declares that it is based on “irony free, wildly contradictory, totally true interviews” with Harding and her ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly. The portrait of Harding drawn by the film is one of sharp edges and hard landings, a woman with raw athletic abilities who couldn’t fit in with the refined image of the figure skating establishment.

Harding made some of her costumes herself and sometimes performed to music by ZZ Top. She also was the first American woman to land the extremely difficult and still-rare triple axel jump in competition. But the scandal that ensued after Kerrigan was attacked at the 1994 national figure skating championships left a long shadow over Harding’s reputation and legacy. Gillooly was implicated in planning the crime, and questions remain about Harding’s level of involvement.

Directed by Craig Gillespie from a screenplay by Steven Rogers, “I, Tonya” is a showcase for energetic, emotional performances by Margot Robbie as Harding, Sebastian Stan as Gillooly and Allison Janney as Harding’s mother, LaVona Golden.

Australian-born Robbie, best-known for her breakthrough role in “The Wolf of Wall Street” and more recently as Harley Quinn in “Suicide Squad,” had never heard the Harding saga when the script first came through her production company, LuckyChap Entertainment. (Robbie is also a producer on the film.) She was immediately struck by the rowdy energy of the storytelling and the complicated depiction of Harding.

“It was a character that scared me but also intrigued me,” said Robbie, who would go on to some five months of figure skating training for the part.

(Read the rest of the interview at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 23 | ‘I, Tonya’ Portrait for Los Angeles Times [+1]
Nicole   12.10.2017   0 Comments

Updated the gallery adding a portrait session Margot did in the past few days while promoting I, Tonya. Several HQ photos are waiting for you in the gallery!

She always look so elegant ♥ Enjoy 🙂 and remember to follow the site’s twitter @MargotRobbieCom!

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 22 | ‘I, Tonya’ Portrait Session [+19]
Nicole   12.09.2017   0 Comments

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY – The 16th-century rivalry between the Queen of Scots and the Virgin Queen was personal — though it didn’t have to be. “They were both, in their own ways, making huge sacrifices to try to operate in this male-dominated world,” explains Josie Rourke, a theater director whose feature debut, Mary, Queen of Scots, examines the rift between the young cousins. “It’s not one against the other. It’s both of them against a particular environment that pitted them against each other.”

Penned by House of Cards creator Beau Willimon and based on a biography by historian John Guy, the film explores the rulers’ lives after Mary Stuart (Saoirse Ronan) returns to Scotland a widowed former queen of France. Her arrival threatens the English throne — then held by Elizabeth I (Margot Robbie) — and ushers in a fraught political period during which the dueling crowns are surrounded by scheming counselors. “Everyone manipulated their relationship,” Robbie says. “It’s complicated, it’s tragic, and it’s bizarre. The only other person in the world who could understand the position they were in was each other.”

On set, Robbie got a taste of that solitude. Playing the smallpox-scarred monarch meant layers of prosthetics and makeup so thick she felt “inhuman,” which eventually led the crew to avoid her gaze. “It was nothing intentional,” she recalls, “but I could see that it was uncomfortable for them, and the less they looked at me, the more isolated I felt.” “Queen for a day” suddenly sounds less appealing.

Mary, Queen of Scots arrives in theaters Nov. 2, 2018. (source)

Film Productions > Mary Queen of Scots (2018) > Production Stills [+1]